Sir William Reid Dick

(1879 - 1961)

Born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1879.

Died in London in 1961.


Sir William Reid Dick was born in Glasgow, Scotland. The long span of his career began as a stone mason’s apprentice at just twelve years of age. Over the following five years he learnt how to carve stone whilst taking night classes in drawing and modelling. In 1896 he completed his apprenticeship, after which he went on to study at Glasgow School of Art. Upon completion of his studies he accepted a teaching post at Bellshill Academy, Lanarkshire. This was short lived and Dick decided to move to London in 1908, where he began to live and exhibit.

He became a Royal Academician in 1928 after seven years as an Associate. From 1933-38 he served as President of the Royal Society of British Sculptors. He was knighted by King George V in 1935.

Dick was renowned as a sculptor of portrait statuary. His direct, stylized, simplicity of form became highly regarded and led to a number of important and successful commissions throughout his career.

His best known works include the “Boy with Frog” fountain in Regents Park; The Eagle on the R.A.F. monument at Victoria Embankment; Franklin Roosevelt in Grosvenor Square; George V opposite the House of Lords; John Soane at the Bank of England and Lady Godiva in Coventry.

He was buried at St. Paul’s Cathedral and his archives can be found at the Tate Gallery.